Tag Archives: recipe

Using Carrier Oils to Dilute Essential Oils

Using Carrier Oils to Dilute Essential Oils

Essential Oils and Carrier Oils are not the same. Essential oils are very potent, need to be used in very small amounts and in most cases need to be diluted before applying to the skin. Carrier oils, sometimes call base oils, are generally skin safe and can be applied to the skin in large quantity, such as in massage or as a moisturizer. Carrier Oils are used to dilute Essential Oils.

Essential Oils are pure in nature, steamed or pressed from various parts of the plant. Carrier oils may also be taken from plant life but are fatty oils rather than pure oil. Similarly, your carrier oils taken from plant life should be cold pressed or cold expeller pressed. Avoid oils that have been heated in the process or those that have been solvent extracted. Heated oils loose valued properties and nutritional values; they are often marked as “refined”. With solvent extraction you are exposed to whatever the solvent was that the plant was extracted into.

No need to search high and low, carrier oils can be found in your kitchen. Common kitchen oils such as olive oil and coconut oil are great carrier oils. However, remember to check the extraction method. Refined coconut oil will not give you the same benefit when applied to the skin as unrefined oil/cold pressed. Additionally, sunflower, almond, shea butter, jojoba, apricot, and avocado oil are excellent choices for use as carrier oils.

Oils both essential and carrier have their own characteristics and can be picked and matched to your personal needs. Some carrier oils are better for oily skin types, some are better for dry. Some oils are high in one nutrient while others are high in a different nutrient. For massage, some oils have a nice glide for while others will absorb quickly into the skin or may be hard to spread. You can become knowledgeable about the characteristics of individual oils with a little research. Start your research by knowing what your needs are and in what type of application or recipe you will use the oil. If all this is more than you care to know or invest time in, than just go to your kitchen cupboard and choose from what you have on hand.

Diluting and blending oils can be as simple or advanced as you would like to make it. Simply add a drop or two of essential oil to a teaspoon of carrier oil in the palm of your hand and apply. Or delve deep into blending and making your own personally targeted massage oils, lotions, creams, and soaps.

To better understand the nature of essential oils and carrier oils do this experiment:

Fold a paper towel into a long strip, drop one drop of several different essential oils and one drop each of several carrier oils onto this paper towel. Watch it over the next several days to see the results. Good quality essential oils should evaporate away while the carrier oils will remain and over time may become sticky.carrier oils.JPG

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Using Sea Salts in Pickling Brines

Using Sea Salts in Pickling Brines

Replace Pickling Salt with Sea Salt in your pickling brine.
Sea Salt has more health benefits than processed salts. The concept behind pickling salt is that they are finely ground to allow them to completely dissolve into the brine. Accomplish this by purchasing a finely ground sea salt, or grinding your coarse salt with a mortar & pestle or electric spice grinder before use. An electric kitchen coffee grinder is great for grinding spices. Regardless of the salt and your method, simmer your brine until your salt is well dissolved.

For the brine, a solution of 5% salt is necessary if you are canning for shelf storage, you can decrease the salt if you are making refrigerator pickles. For shelf storage make sure you follow the necessary steps for proper home canning. I use the “USDA National Center for Home Food Preservation” site for all my home canning and freezing questions. http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/cucumber_pick.html

Here is a basic brine recipe:
12 cups water
4 cups white vinegar
2/3 cups pickling salt
Bring the brine to a rapid boil.

Tumeric as a Tooth Whitener

I’m serious about trying this turmeric toothpaste suggestion for whitening teeth. I followed the recipe suggestions and used: 1 tablespoon coconut oil, 1 teaspoon turmeric root powder, and 2 drops of peppermint oil.
Day Two – Okay, I’ve used the turmeric toothpaste three times. I can report a very clean feeling, and maybe even some whitening. Beware, while it doesn’t stain your teeth it does stain fingernails. I’ll report on the whitening again next week.
Day Five – I said I would report back on the Turmeric Toothpaste blend (coconut oil, turmeric root powder, & salt) so here is what I learned: I feel there was some degree of whitening but ones teeth can only get so white and I am not a young puppy. However, a word of caution, I have two crowns, I am not sure what they are made of, probably porcelain or ceramic, they got really white so now they are whiter than my other teeth. This of course made me curious so I tried it on my tea cups and it was amazing at removing tea stains. Even more curious, I thought maybe it was just the coconut oil, but that did not work. Then, I tried it on my counter top but it left a yellow stain that I had to scrub out with a spray cleaner, don’t do that! And, remember, it stains fingernails. In the end, I do think it has value as a tooth whitener, and there should be some other good benefits beyond whitening. 2016-02-24 10.54.00

House & Home

Holiday events are sold to us by advertisers as quality family time, but you and I both know this is not always the case. When putting together your holiday menu consider that smell can have a dramatic effect on improving our mood and sense of well-being. Citrus is a smell that most people like. It is uplifting and familiar, giving the recipient a warm, trusting and family feeling.   Over the holiday season I like to fragrance my home with the smell of hemlock and a touch of citrus. Orange, tangerine and bergamot are all good choices.

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